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On Employee Advocacy Summit Launches in Atlanta September 2014

Hi Susan - great to see this event coming to fruition. I just hope I can find a way of being there to help spread the word!

April 8, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Thanks DeShelia – you’re so right. My client feedback suggests that this is the most common problem organizations face when introducing advocacy programs – and it doesn’t seem to depend on how big or small you are. Finding someone with the persistence to champion the project at all levels and to win over others to keep up momentum is crucial. Even if you have a committed leadership team, without the day-to-day drive you won’t get far.

April 7, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Hi Lindsay – the work you’re doing sounds terrific. It really underscores the power of motivated people when given the chance to be part of the corporate message – whatever organization they work in. What a great idea you have in your Local Takeover ... I just peeked at your Rio pics.

Your comment also reminded me that your choice of target social networks will vary between organizations, depending on the nature of the content they have to share. Yours is a highly visual industry, so Instagram make perfect sense.

Do keep us updated!

April 7, 2014    View Comment    

On Social Media to the (Cancerous) Bone

Good question - but I don't have a definitive answer. If you need some therapy, here's one I enjoyed that might tickle your comment-writing fancy ...

http://socialmediatoday.com/davidcheng/2318916/content-shock-therapy-completely-biased-diagnosis-linkedin-s-publishing-platform

April 5, 2014    View Comment    

On Social Media to the (Cancerous) Bone

Hi Barry

Powerful stuff. Facing up to mortality often brings people together – you don't have look far ...

Yet most of us are reluctant to open up – worried maybe of how people will react. I have a client who became a good friend after we shared our (scarily similar) reasons for leaving corporate life. The first step is the most difficult, yet the one that counts most.

 

April 5, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Thanks Guillaume – glad you enjoyed the piece. Content generation/curation/creation is a subject area that I intend to cover in some depth in a later article. I listed to a great webinar on the topic recently, presented by Ahava Leibtag on BrightTALK; she focused on the use of cross-departmental teams, hand-picked to include content enthusiasts at all levels of the organization. Maybe we should compare notes, as I’m looking to examine different approaches to this vital element of an advocacy program?

April 5, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Hi Susan – thanks for reading and for sharing your experience. I’ve always believed in the power of great people as the foundation for achieving anything you set your mind to. The really successful companies I’ve worked in have been those where everyone was on-message and comfortable participating – it didn’t matter whether you worked on the factory floor or in the C-suite, you could contribute. They were also the happiest ... coincidence? I think not.

I know exactly what you mean when you talk about tenacity. I’ve had plenty of first-hand experience, flying the flag for initiatives in the face of friendly fire – but if you get enough people believing, you generate the momentum to keep going and to succeed. Today, with all the capabilities of social media and its massive reach, it’s an even more complex task, as I discover repeatedly from my client work, but one that requires just as much persistence and drive.

April 5, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Thanks Mick. It’s such a great fit that I often think that social media could have been invented for advocacy. In times past, word of mouth was as widespread as it got – and it was worth putting in the effort for that.

You’re right to mention authenticity; people soon see through anything forced or staged, although some folks are apprehensive about participating to start. A great champion is essential to get over these hurdles.

April 5, 2014    View Comment    

On LinkedIn's Publisher Platform: Should You Use It?

Great article Andrew – it’s a subject close to my heart! You may also enjoy this discussion here on SMT along similar lines.

My experience of LinkedIn publishing is excellent. I was given privileges after three weeks on the wait-list and I published one post so far. It attracted 1,200 views and several comments inside 24 hours and has reached 1,600 views and 24 likes after a week. It’s been shared to social media 126 times (more than 100 to LinkedIn). I also received two direct messages from people wanting to continue the discussion offline – all great outcomes.

BTW I have just over 200 connections.

The same article on my own website hasn’t got anywhere near that – probably because I don’t have a following there. Anecdotal evidence from other LinkedIn members who are also publishers suggest that getting picked up by Pulse is key to big exposure, engagement and following.

Is it worth using? In my view, definitely – although you may like to read this article on the subject that I wrote for the CMI blog.

April 4, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Engagement: Unleashing the Power of Employee Advocacy

Thanks for reading Daniel – I agree absolutely that non-marketing people bring a fresh angle to almost any topic. It’s essential to have a cross-departmental approach to advocacy to get the flavor right.

Effective training and a clear explanation of your policy on social-media governance is essential to keep the program within limits. As you say, “over-advocacy” can be counter-productive.

April 4, 2014    View Comment    

On Content Shock Therapy: A Completely Biased Diagnosis of LinkedIn's Publishing Platform

Thanks for the reply David. Great discussion here - you certainly don’t come across as anti-LinkedIn.

Almost everything you’ve said aligns with my way of thinking. I put my views on record in a recent post on the CMI blog; my article warns, inter alia, of the deluge of sub-standard content that will likely result from LinkedIn’s open-door policy on publishing.

It’s the “use-case” point that still has me wondering. As I said in my reply to David, I’m a businessman first and a social-media user next – and only lately at that; I don’t see myself as a paid-up member of the sales and marketing community you mention. I’m interested in the power of SM, including LinkedIn, to drive engagement for organizations that truly believe in its potential, and it’s this that has me looking at use cases that are directly related neither to recruitment nor “content-marketing.”

I’ve long been a believer in the strength of brand advocacy. My experience of “staff champions” long before the days of SM and my more recent work with a client in the sector leave me convinced of the opportunity for SM in the process. I see more and more organisations opening up personal social-media networks for business communication, on LinkedIn and elsewhere, although I can’t put numbers to it. As I said before, although recruiters still make good use of LinkedIn, I’m not convinced that the “vast majority” of members still see job-hunting as their primary reason for being there.

Maybe we should take this aspect of the debate offline as it’s not germane to the main thrust of your article! Don’t want to drag things off-topic ...

April 4, 2014    View Comment    

On Content Shock Therapy: A Completely Biased Diagnosis of LinkedIn's Publishing Platform

John, I think you’re being modest – I suspect I’m the newbie in this debate. Yes, I’m in favour of the Publishing platform, although with the reservations that I outlined in my reply to Linda. There is no place for mindless content that just takes up space and buries the nuggets that people can use to help them.

I think I’m fairly typical of a growing number of users who see LinkedIn as a place to do things that aren’t directly related to recruitment. I spent 30 years working in and eventually running bricks-and-mortar businesses. When I grew up, social media was the “Letters to the Editor” column in the local paper, but I look at today’s plethora of platforms from a business perspective. How can they help me engage with people who can use what I have to offer?

Well, nowadays I offer business advice to SMBs and start-ups, many of whom turn to content for information. Since I also write, I use content as a means of (I hope) demonstrating my expertise in specific niches. My single post to date on LinkedIn did exactly that, and it generated engagement well beyond any post on my own blog, including two direct messages from people wanting to continue the discussion offline. To me, that’s an effective use of my time.

Whether you choose to publish on your own platform or on LinkedIn - or both - depends, I believe, on your standalone strength. In my case, it’s not enough to get me noticed (much), so LinkedIn makes sense. I still own the content, although LinkedIn may choose to publish it elsewhere as well. I think Mark Traphagen’s comments are balanced and along the same lines.

Hope this helps ...

April 4, 2014    View Comment    
 
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