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Comments by Kathy Klotz-Guest Subscribe

On Every Organization Needs a Chief Marketing Improvisation Officer

Thanks, Lauren.  Business is truly a social stage!

May 14, 2013    View Comment    

On Humor Me! Lighten Up Your B2B Marketing and Get Results

So true, Robin. Sometimes we just have to outsource things we're not good at: like haircuts and taxes (for me)!  If writing isn't your thing - get the "write" help!

December 11, 2012    View Comment    

On As in successful dating, customer relationships require shared values.

Thanks, Chris. Appreciate the comment. 

You are so right. We are who we are - and if a company has a strong mission and purpose, that can help it to connect with people on a visceral level. So instead of masking the corporate identity with "data," it's time to embrace your values and lead with them!

Best-

Kathy

 

July 25, 2012    View Comment    

On Shore Up Your Business Video Storytelling with Ten Practices

Ha! Not that it wouldn't be great to go viral, but...yes, viral shouldn't be your primary goal.

 

 

June 20, 2012    View Comment    

On A More Social, “Human” Model for Brainstorming Means Better Business Outcomes

Exactly, Sankar. It's about co-defining value. That's key! Thank you for your post.

January 5, 2011    View Comment    

On A More Social, “Human” Model for Brainstorming Means Better Business Outcomes

Great comments, John. However, I stand by my assertion 100%!  Right brain thinking IS critical. I know from experience. I say that as both someone who has run marketing department in high-tech, created products, and has a strong left-brain and right-brain honed by many years doing improvisation. I am not saying here that we should jettison left-brained skills. On the contrary, I am advocate of better integration of both - bringing in right-brained skills to work together with left-brain thinking, so we use the best of both. We need both. Brain science on creativity is becoming better understood but is still very much in its infancy - see Charles Limb's latest TED talk. Moreover, check out Dan Pink's books on the need for right-brained folks within the corporate enterprise. The issue has been that right-brain thinkig in corporate America - and in our educational system - has been under-valued. I am familiar with Witkins' work.

Yes, these ideas are not new. I think what's changed is that a) companies are more willing to employ different techniques than in the past; 2) the management science surrounding these approaches is becoming better documented and becoming more accepted. The brain science to better understand this stuff is also a burgeoning field. And, finally, you have social technologies allowing new ways of co-creation that didn't exist in the past. So now older ideas meet with new ways of thinking about them and putting them into practice.

January 5, 2011    View Comment    

On A More Social, “Human” Model for Brainstorming Means Better Business Outcomes

Great comments, John. However, I stand by my assertion 100%!  Right brain thinking IS critical. I know from experience. I say that as both someone who has run marketing department in high-tech, created products, and has a strong left-brain and right-brain honed by many years doing improvisation. I am not saying here that we should jettison left-brained skills. On the contrary, I am advocate of better integration of both - bringing in right-brained skills to work together with left-brain thinking, so we use the best of both. We need both. Brain science on creativity is becoming better understood but is still very much in its infancy - see Charles Limb's latest TED talk. Moreover, check out Dan Pink's books on the need for right-brained folks within the corporate enterprise. The issue has been that right-brain thinkig in corporate America - and in our educational system - has been under-valued. I am familiar with Witkins' work.

Yes, these ideas are not new. I think what's changed is that a) companies are more willing to employ different techniques than in the past; 2) the management science surrounding these approaches is becoming better documented and becoming more accepted. The brain science to better understand this stuff is also a burgeoning field. And, finally, you have social technologies allowing new ways of co-creation that didn't exist in the past. So now older ideas meet with new ways of thinking about them and putting them into practice.

January 5, 2011    View Comment    

On Where There’s Jargon, There’s Parody...And a Few Serious Marketing Reminders

Absolutely, Lacey. I hate jargon wherever it lives - whether it's in new media or traditional media. Jargon gets between marketers and their customers. It works against building solid relationships and clarity. Because much of the noise and jargon in marketing today focuses on new media, it's important to keep reminding marketers that when jargon reaches viral status, we all have to step back and reconsider if we are - even indadvertantly - contributing to the din. If so-called (and credible) experts can't be clear in how they discuss new media, how can those trying to get up the learning curve easily ferret out fact from fiction - especially if they rely on the experts to help them? Anyone can use jargon. True experts don't need to. It is the hallmark of great marketing to aim above the fray and cut through the nonsense.

August 15, 2010    View Comment    

On Where There’s Jargon, There’s Parody...And a Few Serious Marketing Reminders

Great point, Tom. And as thought leaders, those on the vanguard of new thinking absolutely need to make sure we don't buy into jargon and hype. Thought leaders can always stay above the jargon so that they can ask the important questions that help marketers evolve their thinking.

August 15, 2010    View Comment    
 
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