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On Content Shock Therapy: A Completely Biased Diagnosis of LinkedIn's Publishing Platform

LinkedIn is doing exactly the right thing. LinkedIn owns the network and if you use their publishing platform, they will promote it over your non-LinkedIn content. That is their right since it's their network.

But if this was the issue of net neutrality and LinkedIn was Comcast and their network was broadband, is the question murkier?

I will use LinkedIn's platform with both eyes wide open. LinkedIn's primary objective (and rightly so) is to get people to STAY on LinkedIn, not to go somewhere else. If that's a problem for your business, then you may want to focus on another social network / distribution platform.

April 4, 2014    View Comment    

On Content Shock Therapy: A Completely Biased Diagnosis of LinkedIn's Publishing Platform

Linda, you hit the nail on the head.

LinkedIn alone is the most uniquely positioned to solve content shock. Unfortunately, because the vast majority of LinkedIn users don't use or derive value from LinkedIn the way power users do, the content will just end up as noise.

It'll be interesting if LinkedIn decides to push Pulse separately, the way Facebook is pushing Paper.

April 3, 2014    View Comment    

On Content Shock Therapy: A Completely Biased Diagnosis of LinkedIn's Publishing Platform

Thanks Mike. Great points and questions.

Marketing solutions (their content-monetization product) is 25% of revenue, whereas recruiting is 55% and premium accounts (which I suspect is a blend of recruiting/marketing) is the remainder. See here: http://press.linkedin.com/about

Remember that people in the sales & marketing community are not the typical use case for the other 277 million members on LinkedIn. Most people don't produce content; they all need jobs though. As a smell test, ask people in your family who have different careers how they use LinkedIn and with what frequency. You can also quickly still see how professional content is being shared. Go to any professional content site (like Social Media Today) and look at the social shares widget. Typically, it's Twitter in the lead, followed by Facebook, LinkedIn or GooglePlus depending on your vertical.

Finally, I hope this post doesn't suggest I'm "anti-LinkedIn." I use it daily, I have friends who work there (at somewhat senior levels) and I think it's a wonderful product. But I know a land grab when I see one and the move towards content publishing is not, in my humble opinion, a strategic move to improve content quality. Rather, it's a move to increase engagement on the site. If I'm a publisher working with LinkedIn, I would tread carefully.

April 3, 2014    View Comment    

On How This Famous Oscar Photobomb Defines Twitter for Marketers

I think it depends on the Twitter account. It's worked well for us because we don't do it for the bots.

March 6, 2014    View Comment    

On How #SFBatKid Saved the Day, Melted Our Hearts and Won the Internet

I just made the edit in the post and also edited it on my original post at our blog: http://blog.sharebloc.com/post/67412849515/how-sfbatkid-saved-the-day-melted-our-hearts-and-won.

Great job!

November 20, 2013    View Comment    
 
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