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Posted by: Brad Friedman

Cloud Storage Options Are Many

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Most of my clients are talking about cloud storage and the various services being offered “in the cloud.” Financial services providers, for example, are wondering where they are going to store all the social media and other data FINRA regulations require them to store. Law firms, accounting firms and small businesses are wondering if they need to be spending money on hardware and software or on storage and other cloud services. Firms are establishing specialties in providing virtual business solutions for their clients. Cloud storage/services is a topic that is becoming more and more important and we are helping you analyze your options.

This infographic just scratches the surface and compares Google Drive to its top three competitors: Dropbox, Microsoft’s Skydrive, and Apple’s iCloud. It takes a look at, pricing, and platform support, and a brief history of these cloud services.

Infographic: Cloud Storage Options Are Many
Infographic by Infographic Labs
Submitted by Brad Friedman


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March 26, 2014

Evangelinelady Fayeeykj says:

This provides meraki networking administrators with visibility and control, at minimal cost and with less complexity – benefits that aren’t achievable with the controller appliances or overlay management software associated with traditional architectures.

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April 28, 2013

Uchenna Ani-Okoye says:

I somewhat agree with your assertions, but I must say that people have taken to cloud storage because it’s a viable alternative method of backing up your data. Ultimately, no method is 100% foolproof, which is why it’s always best practice to utilise as many modes of securing your data as possible.

Uchenna from Computer Q & A

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April 28, 2013

Brad Friedman says:

I agree! Many people are utilizing cloud storage and you point that "no method is 100% foolproof" is entirely accurate. Thanks for taking the time to comment to the post.

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July 21, 2012

Kristof Bernaert says:

None of my smaller customers are much aware about the cloud possibilities.

Anyway, it is clear it can much cheaper than having your own secured inhouse self hosted server. Cutting costs are these days quite important, which we do for example by moving a lot of our customers (having eg an own MS SBS server) to Google Apps (e-mail) and Dropbox (file)

But some of our customers are law firms, and moving them to the cloud is a completely other question.

It's not the first time that we hear that courts in for example USA are forcing cloud companies to give them information.

Just simply suppose a lawyer is working on a case, with a counterpart in for example USA, who enables the possibility to force a cloud hoster to liberate content ... .

A lot if's of course. But it is simply possible. Or the other way, it's impossible to exclude this security risk.
Here, cloud hosting is not an option for us to rollout at those kind of critical customers... because at the end, we are also responsible for the secured data of our customer what for they engaged us.

 

What you not own yourself, is owned by another. As simple as that.

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July 23, 2012

Brad Friedman says:

Thanks for taking the time to comment on my post. You raise some good points, especially about security issues around documents stored in the cloud by attorneys. I'd assume the same rules of discovery would apply regardless of where the actual documents are stored. The rules of evidence are likely to be evolving along with the technology. A friend of mine works with law firms and has no hesitation storing their docuements in Google's Drive.

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August 6, 2012

Kristof Bernaert says:

Hi Brad

Another interesting article about your topic: http://read.bi/Pzz9BO

And just another idea. What happens when a company goes bankrupted with cloud data?
Can the hosting provider value it by selling the data?


And yes, we are all NOT reading the selling agreements we sign by cliking on the ok button :-)

I'll have the discussion with some of my law firms. But from my point of vue, I'll never  guarantee them the privacy when storing online.

Kristof Bernaert (@ssstofff)

 

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August 21, 2012

Chris Cavanaugh says:

Hi Kristof,

 

I personally think that someone must be out of his mind to put valuable private information on cloud storage. As you just said, nobody reads all the privacy implications of the agreements they accept in seconds.

If you want to keep something private and safe, keep it yourself. This is by far the best option.

From my point of view, cloud storage is usfeul only for not very important data that will not cause any problem if shared, copied or deleted. And with today's cheap and huge external hard drives, the problem of data storage is not a problem anymore. I am really surprised to see that this cloud market is considered so important, but I guess many people don't think the way I do and use those services.

 

All the best!

Chris from Binary Options

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