Twitter announced the new ‘related headlines’ feature on the Twitter blog. Tweets which have been embedded into articles will now display this information on Twitter, so that users can discover more about the content of a tweet by clicking through to an article.

Of course, only a few tweets – those that break important news or become popular on Twitter – get embedded into other websites. For example, When NBA player Jason Collins publicly came out earlier this year, one of his tweets was embedded into an ESPN article, a FOX Sports article and a Mashable article.

The additional information provided by the ‘related headlines’ feature gives tweets context, while also driving traffic onto relevant sites. Media companies like ESPN, FOX and Mashable will benefit greatly from the new feature, as every tweet they embed in an article will drive traffic to their websites.

The feature, which has been tested since July, will improve Twitter’s functionality during big events and news stories. More people will access Twitter during big events or breaking news stories in order to find out what’s happening, as they’ll be able to see what stories are trending thanks to Twitter’s instantaneous nature, then navigate through to a page with more information.

Of course, the feature will also help bloggers and Twitter users, in the same way it will help media outlets. Bloggers can embed relevant tweets into the articles they write. The more popular the tweet, the more likely it will drive traffic onto their blog. Tweets which are embedded in articles, meanwhile, will seem more credible, encouraging users to click through to the tweeters account.

If someone tweets a statistic on Twitter, for example, that will help support the information in an article you are writing, then embed it: you will get traffic from the tweet and you will help drive traffic to the person who tweeted it. There’s no harm in getting a little Karma on your side. Of course, bear in mind that most tweets have a finite lifespan: even the most popular tweets and trending topics disappear within 48 hours on the service.

So, embedding a tweet will have instant benefits to the tweeter and the embedder, but the benefits to the embedder will wain. Meanwhile, as long as the article where the tweet is embedded continues to be popular, the Tweeter will continue to benefit from click-throughs from the site.

The ‘related headlines’ feature is still at a very early stage in its development, but it will be interesting to see how people use it to promote their twitter accounts and their blogs.

How are you going to use the ‘related headlines’ feature?